Science communications and science literacy: an evening in Victoria, B.C.

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On Friday, September 22, Science Borealis partnered with the Science Writers and Communicators of Canada (SWCC), Vancouver’s Curiosity Collider, and the Royal BC Museum (RBCM) for an evening of science communication fun. The event was originally meant to be just an SWCC Book Award presentation, but former SWCC Board member Shelley McIvor (also a co-founder […]

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Is extinction really forever?

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By Robert Gooding-Townsend, Science in Society co-editor Can biotechnology bring back extinct species? If it can, should it? In her new book Rise of the Necrofauna, Britt Wray chronicles the nascent movement to bring back extinct species. She calls these resurrected creatures “necrofauna”, conjuring images of undead mammoths, passenger pigeons, and more. As compelling as the […]

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A Q&A with The Atlantic’s Ed Yong 

By Erin Zimmerman, Co-editor, Science in Society Following his recent keynote address at the Canadian Society of Microbiology conference in Waterloo, Ontario, my Science Borealis colleague, Robert Gooding Townsend and I chatted with Ed Yong, author of the New York Times bestseller, I Contain Multitudes, about getting started in science communication, using humour in your […]

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Science advocacy can save Canadian science (and the next generation of Canadian scientists)

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By Molly Meng-Hua Sung, guest contributor This past year, the long-awaited Fundamental Science Review (commonly referred to as the Naylor Report) was submitted to Canada’s Minister of Science, the Honourable Kirsty Duncan. It confirmed something scientists have been saying for years: funding is tight. Furthermore, the strain of poor funding is borne largely by young […]

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Canadian science needs more than funding: it needs public champions

by Dr. Sarah Boon, Science Borealis co-founder and Board of Directors member Two reviews of Canadian science were released recently: the Naylor Report and the Global Young Academy report. While both champion Canadian science, neither report mentions that increasing funding for Canadian science requires public support and a strong Canadian science culture, which requires effective […]

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