La montée des prix de l’essence révèle les algorithmes régissant le capitalisme

Kyle Pearce CC BY-SA 2.0

Robert Gooding-Townsend, éditeur Science et Société Vers la fin de février, le prix de l’essence à Vancouver a dépassé les 1.50$ le litre, ce qui représente une augmentation de 20¢ en seulement deux semaines. La cause de cette augmentation est la fermeture d’une raffinerie importante à Burnaby. Au même moment, Taiwan connaissait une pénurie de […]

Continue reading


Gas price spikes reveal the algorithms behind capitalism

Kyle Pearce CC BY-SA 2.0

Robert Gooding-Townsend, Science in Society editor Late this February, gas prices in Vancouver surged to over $1.50 a litre, an increase of 20¢ in just two weeks. This was due to the shutdown of a key refinery in Burnaby. Around the same time, Taiwan was running out of toilet paper, which was partly caused by […]

Continue reading


A mathematical picture of the genome

tarsier

By Malgosia Ip, Mathematics and Statistics Editor Meet the Philippine tarsier: a tiny primate with giant eyes that’s native to the Philippine archipelago. Despite its small size, this little fella has been the subject of controversy for over a century—is it more closely related to the lemur (a so-called “wet-nosed” primate) or to apes and […]

Continue reading


Fold it right there: The mathematical art of paper folding

The 2007 CSAIL puzzle created by Erik and Martin Demaine. Reproduced with permission. 

By Malgosia Ip, Mathematics and Statistics Editor “I really don’t think it’s possible,” I say again, unfolding the rumpled sheet of paper. I have been trying to solve one of Erik Demaine’s folding puzzles for a few hours now. Some of the creases have been folded so many times that the paper is starting to […]

Continue reading