A Q&A with The Atlantic’s Ed Yong 

By Erin Zimmerman, Co-editor, Science in Society Following his recent keynote address at the Canadian Society of Microbiology conference in Waterloo, Ontario, my Science Borealis colleague, Robert Gooding Townsend and I chatted with Ed Yong, author of the New York Times bestseller, I Contain Multitudes, about getting started in science communication, using humour in your […]

Continue reading


Science advocacy can save Canadian science (and the next generation of Canadian scientists)

Scientists-march-on-Parliament-Hill

By Molly Meng-Hua Sung, guest contributor This past year, the long-awaited Fundamental Science Review (commonly referred to as the Naylor Report) was submitted to Canada’s Minister of Science, the Honourable Kirsty Duncan. It confirmed something scientists have been saying for years: funding is tight. Furthermore, the strain of poor funding is borne largely by young […]

Continue reading


Canadian science needs more than funding: it needs public champions

by Dr. Sarah Boon, Science Borealis co-founder and Board of Directors member Two reviews of Canadian science were released recently: the Naylor Report and the Global Young Academy report. While both champion Canadian science, neither report mentions that increasing funding for Canadian science requires public support and a strong Canadian science culture, which requires effective […]

Continue reading


Toxoplasmosis and the zombie mouse in my backyard

Mice-are-integral-to-the-T-gondii-lifecycle_Photo-Alexas-Fotos-cc0-via-Pixabay

By Ainslie Butler and Lindsay Jolivet, Health, Medicine, and Veterinary Science Co-editors This summer, I made friends with a zombie mouse. One recent evening as I was sitting in my suburban Toronto backyard, a tiny mouse that often visits began behaving strangely. Instead of scurrying across the patio like usual, my mouse buddy started running […]

Continue reading


Fold it right there: The mathematical art of paper folding

The 2007 CSAIL puzzle created by Erik and Martin Demaine. Reproduced with permission. 

By Malgosia Ip, Mathematics and Statistics Editor “I really don’t think it’s possible,” I say again, unfolding the rumpled sheet of paper. I have been trying to solve one of Erik Demaine’s folding puzzles for a few hours now. Some of the creases have been folded so many times that the paper is starting to […]

Continue reading