Canadian Women In STEM Conference: How do we keep women in STEM?

courtesy-of-hEr-VOLUTION

Farah Qaiser, Policy & Politics Co-Editor Throughout 2017, gender, diversity and inclusivity in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields has been a contentious topic. The Naylor Report marked it as an issue that needs immediate attention in academic circles, and this year’s male-dominated Nobel prizes, followed extensively in the news, underscored the problem. The […]

Continue reading


Melding art and science for PTSD treatments 

Image1_Stefan-Schweihofer_Pixabay

By Catherine Lau, Biology and Life Sciences Co-editor It’s happening again. You are reliving that moment in your head and you can’t stop it. No, it’s not a bad dream, it’s a real memory and it stunts you and makes you unreasonably nervous. Living a normal life suddenly becomes a challenge. What can you do? […]

Continue reading


The elusive wolverine: Beyond the X-Men character

Elusive-wolverine

By Alina Fisher, Environmental and Earth Science co-editor When you think of a wolverine, do you think of an elusive, almost mythical creature with superpowers, or do you think of the comic book character? Most people have heard of the X-Men, either through the movies or the comic book series, but few people know about […]

Continue reading


Science communications and science literacy: an evening in Victoria, B.C.

Sean-McCann-spider-photos

On Friday, September 22, Science Borealis partnered with the Science Writers and Communicators of Canada (SWCC), Vancouver’s Curiosity Collider, and the Royal BC Museum (RBCM) for an evening of science communication fun. The event was originally meant to be just an SWCC Book Award presentation, but former SWCC Board member Shelley McIvor (also a co-founder […]

Continue reading


Is extinction really forever?

mammoth-skeleton_Wilhelm-Tilesius

By Robert Gooding-Townsend, Science in Society co-editor Can biotechnology bring back extinct species? If it can, should it? In her new book Rise of the Necrofauna, Britt Wray chronicles the nascent movement to bring back extinct species. She calls these resurrected creatures “necrofauna”, conjuring images of undead mammoths, passenger pigeons, and more. As compelling as the […]

Continue reading