From Our Own Borealis Blog

Science Essays: Another Way to Explore the Facts

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By Erin Zimmerman, Co-editor, Science in Society “A piece of writing has to start somewhere, go somewhere, and sit down when it gets there.” — Essayist John McPhee, Draft No. 4 What is it? Many people are unaware that science essays are their own genre. They can masquerade as other things: features, reviews, researched personal essays, […]

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How Canada combats antimicrobial resistance

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By Nahomi Amberber, Policy & Politics Co-Editor Do you remember how many times you’ve been prescribed an antibiotic or used an antifungal cream for an unexplained rash? Most people don’t either, which speaks volumes about the role antimicrobials play in modern healthcare. It also highlights the threat of antimicrobial resistance to global health. Antimicrobial resistance […]

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On first looking into the Large Hadron Collider

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by Jamieson Findlay, guest contributor The European home for big-horizon science is, fittingly, surrounded by an impressive mountainscape. To the north is the Swiss range of the Jura Mountains; to the south, the French Alps. On a clear day, you can see the radiant face of Mont Blanc, Europe’s highest peak, beckoning to tourists and […]

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From chaotic to biotic

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By Jamie Miller, guest contributor from the Nature Conservancy of Canada There’s a new breed of problem emerging, and these problems are making a lot of people uncomfortable. Aptly named “wicked problems” because of their complex and high uncertainty, they’re defined by having multiple contradicting values, high uncertainty, high stakes and require urgent decision-making. They’re […]

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A mathematical picture of the genome

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By Malgosia Ip, Mathematics and Statistics Editor Meet the Philippine tarsier: a tiny primate with giant eyes that’s native to the Philippine archipelago. Despite its small size, this little fella has been the subject of controversy for over a century—is it more closely related to the lemur (a so-called “wet-nosed” primate) or to apes and […]

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