#ProjectedFutures2: My science journalism experience

Farah Qaiser, Policy and Politics Co-Editor Over the last few years, science writing, communication and journalism have become popular fields to turn to as careers or as ways for scientists to improve their public engagement skills. With this increased interest, there’s also been a steady increase in the number of workshops, courses and programs available […]

Continue reading


Celebrating Earth Day with Jane Goodall

Farah Qaiser, Policy & Politics co-editor On Sunday, April 22, 2018, Jane Goodall celebrated Earth Day at the University of Toronto with a short talk, followed by a Q&A with Andria Teather, CEO of the Jane Goodall Institute Canada. Goodall is a British primatologist who is best known for her 55-plus years of studying the […]

Continue reading


March for Science returns for a second year

By Farah Qaiser, Policy & Politics co-editor   On Saturday, April 14, scientists and science enthusiasts once again took to the streets to advocate for science and evidence-informed policy. This year, there were 230+ March for Science satellite events across the world. In Canada, Evidence for Democracy (along with local organizers) arranged events in 10 […]

Continue reading


Ramen and Research: how STEM graduate students pay for school

Farah Qaiser and Nahomi Amberber, Policy and Politics co-editors Graduate students play a key role in their scientific fields. Under the supervision of a trained scientist, these students learn how to propose novel ideas, carry out experiments to test their hypotheses, and contribute to the science community’s growing hub of knowledge. However, a day in […]

Continue reading


Canadian Women In STEM Conference: how do we keep women in STEM?

courtesy-of-hEr-VOLUTION

Farah Qaiser, Policy & Politics Co-Editor Throughout 2017, gender, diversity and inclusivity in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields has been a contentious topic. The Naylor Report marked it as an issue that needs immediate attention in academic circles, and this year’s male-dominated Nobel prizes, followed extensively in the news, underscored the problem. The […]

Continue reading