Something’s fishy: A whirlwind of a problem

by Raechel Bonomo, guest contributor As I spend most of my free time outdoors, I’ve been fortunate enough to see many great examples of Canadian nature. I have watched a family of deer feeding by a stream in Alberta, seen tracks of several elusive mammal species, such as porcupine and white-tailed deer, hiding in the […]

Continue reading


Long live loons and their research

Robert Alvo, guest contributor, Nature Conservancy of Canada In the 1970s, North Americans were already concerned about the effects of human activity on the common loon, a large charismatic diving bird that breeds on lakes. My bachelor’s thesis at Queen’s University examined this concern on 10 lakes in Ontario in 1980. On busy lakes, boats […]

Continue reading


It’s complicated, honey: Bees vs… bees

Kevin Van Tighem, Nature Conservancy of Canada Spring draws nigh: the season of the birds and the bees. Birdsong is a welcome gift, but where would we be without bees? Their obsessive quest for pollen and nectar keeps much of Alberta’s native flora alive. There would be fewer willows, flowers and garden crops without pollinator insects […]

Continue reading


Tracking animals by what they leave behind

Raechel Bonomo, guest contributor, Nature Conservancy of Canada Wildlife tracking is one of the many fun nature activities you can take part in. One of my favourite pastimes is pointing out something to a friend or family member that they may have never noticed before, especially something left behind by species living in the area. […]

Continue reading


Look for these first signs of spring across Canada

NCC

by Wendy Ho, Nature Conservancy of Canada, guest author With the springing forward of our clocks and increased daylight, many Canadians are getting antsy for the arrival of spring, perhaps especially for our friends in the Atlantic provinces (darn you, Nor’easter!). What can be more delightful than noticing the little signs that signal the arrival […]

Continue reading