Will there be a science-focused debate during the 2015 election campaign?

political leaders

by Pascal Lapointe and Josh Silberg Policy and politics subject editors In a Toronto Star opinion piece published on August 12, Katie Gibbs and Alana Westwood of Evidence for Democracy called for a national science debate between federal political leaders. Librarian John Dupuis echoed Evidence for Democracy’s sentiment in a recent blog post, and began […]

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Muzzled Open Access

open access muzzle

by Josh Silberg and Pascal Lapointe Policy and politics subject editors When federal scientists asked Ottawa to enshrine scientific integrity in their upcoming collective agreement, the mainstream media began to take notice (again). The muzzling of federal scientists has been discussed for years in several venues, including an investigative report by CBC’s The Fifth Estate […]

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CSPC2014: Policy Makers Should Listen to Policy Experts and Scientists

by Karine Morin Science Policy subject editor Last week marked the sixth Canadian Science Policy Conference, and the fifth I’ve attended. Some topics seem to recur annually: entrepreneurship, the importance and challenges of research collaborations, and big data. However, each meeting also reveals something unexpected. This year’s unexpected aspect was a session focused on Canada’s […]

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What the Franklin expedition says about Canadian research priorities

By Pascal Lapointe and Karine Morin Policy and politics subject editors The discovery of one of the long-lost Franklin ships is surely big news, archaeologically speaking. But it is also highly political. Not simply because Franklin is used as a symbol of Canadian sovereignty in the Arctic, but also in the context of what has […]

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The Canadian response to Ebola: a new science diplomacy?

By Pascal Lapointe & Karine Morin Policy & Politics subject editors In early August, the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade, and Development (DFATD) announced that Canada would provide $3.6 million dollars to both the World Health Organization (WHO) and Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) to help the international Ebola effort. This was not the […]

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