Is the Antarctica ice sheet the key to understanding neutrinos?

Scientists are hoping to boost the ability of the neutrino detection system, IceCube.

Michelle Hampson, Astronomy and Physics guest contributor Neutrinos are mysterious particles that hardly ever interact with matter. About 100 trillion pass through your body each second without you knowing any better. Despite their abundance, however, their laissez faire behavior makes them extremely difficult to study. Scientists have been working for decades to pinpoint the astrophysical sources of these […]

Continue reading


How close are we to printing replacement body parts?

Erin Bedford, Technology and Engineering co-editor Three-dimensional (3D) printing, the technology used to turn a three-dimensional digital design into an object by depositing material one layer at a time, has taken off in recent years. It now seems like almost anything can be 3D printed—shoes, airplane parts, houses—so why not print body parts too? It […]

Continue reading


On first looking into the Large Hadron Collider

Findlay-ATLAS

by Jamieson Findlay, guest contributor The European home for big-horizon science is, fittingly, surrounded by an impressive mountainscape. To the north is the Swiss range of the Jura Mountains; to the south, the French Alps. On a clear day, you can see the radiant face of Mont Blanc, Europe’s highest peak, beckoning to tourists and […]

Continue reading


A formidable woman takes her place in Canadian chemistry: an interview with Dr. Katherine Elvira

By Connie Tang, Chemistry Co-Editor Dr. Katherine Elvira is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Victoria (UVic) in British Columbia. She first discovered her passion for analytical chemistry as an undergraduate student, but had to overcome the challenges of being a female researcher in a male-dominated discipline to realize […]

Continue reading