Long live loons and their research

Robert Alvo, guest contributor, Nature Conservancy of Canada In the 1970s, North Americans were already concerned about the effects of human activity on the common loon, a large charismatic diving bird that breeds on lakes. My bachelor’s thesis at Queen’s University examined this concern on 10 lakes in Ontario in 1980. On busy lakes, boats […]

Continue reading


It’s not a bird, it’s not a plane, it’s not even a dinosaur…it’s a pterosaur!

llustrations of 33 different pterosaur headcrests, showing the diversity of this group of reptiles.

 By Sri Ray-Chauduri and Kathi Unglert, Earth and Environmental Sciences Co-editors Dinosaurs always seem to excite people, whether it’s an actual discovery, like the tail vertebrae with feathers found this past December in Myanmar, or fictional stories, like Hollywood’s upcoming Jurassic World 2, rumoured to combine human and dinosaur DNA in the plot. But dinosaurs, which lived […]

Continue reading


Arctic Breeding Common Eiders and the Students that Study Them

eider duck

Guest post by Rolanda Steenweg, PhD candidate, Dalhousie University & Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) member Celebrating Polar Week: March 14-20, 2016 A new field season On little East Bay Island, off Southampton Island, Nunavut, biologists slumber in their cool, grey cabin. Surrounded by ice, they anticipate the spring arrival of their study […]

Continue reading


The end of the rainbow: Invasive species and the real costs of ecological monkey-wrenching

Guest post by Dan Kraus, Nature Conservancy of Canada Somewhere in the rivers of southern Ontario is a species few people have heard of, and even fewer have ever seen. It’s simply named the rainbow. The rainbow is a freshwater clam that gets its name from the rich iridescent colours on its shell. It’s so […]

Continue reading