The rising concern about plastic pollution: imminent consequences and possible solutions

By Christine Thou, Environmental Sciences editor In December 2019, residents of the Isle of Harris in Scotland found a dead sperm whale washed up on a beach. The whale died after ingesting 220 pounds of plastic that had been carelessly discarded into the ocean. Over the last 60 years, plastic products have been used to […]

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Contaminant bioaccumulation in fish and aquatic environments

By Dorottya Harangi, Health, Medicine and Veterinary Sciences editor Have you ever been told that you should be careful about how much tuna you eat? Part of the reason why is bioaccumulation, which is when the level of certain toxins (for example, DDT or mercury) increases in concentration in the bodies of organisms as you […]

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If you can’t beat the cold, join it: How animals cope with Canadian winters

By Nada Salem and Zahra Nassar, Chemistry co-editors We’re almost there! We’ve survived another Canadian winter. It’s just about time to take off our scarves and hats and leave this winter season behind. This year was a tad colder than usual, with Vancouver (Canada’s characteristically warm haven) experiencing its lowest temperatures in 52 years. While […]

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Traditional Ecological Knowledge and science: a path forward

By Mary Anne Schoenhardt, Science in Society editor “A foot in both worlds” is how Ph.D. student Enooyaq Sudlovenick describes her work. An Inuk studying the health of beluga whales at the University of Manitoba, she uses a combination of the scientific method and traditional Inuit knowledge in her research. She monitors environmental contaminants and […]

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Microfibre mitigation: Keeping clothing fibres out of the environment

by Esme Symons, Technology & Engineering editor Washing can be hard on clothes. It removes dirt but can also remove tiny strands of clothing. These microfibres then go down the drain and into the environment. As the “micro” prefix suggests, each fibre is at most 5 mm long. Together, the impact of these fibres is […]

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