From Our Own Borealis Blog

What are Canadian climate scientists doing?

CCGS Amundsen

Tristan MacLean, Evidence for Democracy, guest contributor If I look outside my back door, I can see an old thermometer on my deck. To be honest, it’s not much use to me. It’s often too hot as it catches the sun’s rays reflected off the white walls of our house, or too cold because it’s […]

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How to look at (and appreciate) SciArt

Raymond Nakamura

Katrina Vera Wong and Raymond Nakamura, Multi-media co-editors Some time ago, we talked to artists about what sciart is to them and what it could be. Various fields of science holding hands with art’s indefinability results in a complex relationship. In this post, rather than pinning down sciart’s definition, we’re going to explore some other […]

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Hummingbirds: The forgotten pollinator when it comes to pesticides

Lené Gary, General Science co-editor When life is leaping forth in its freshest tender green and shrubs are casting best their wine-rich blooms of color, there comes a humming. Not just from the song of spring rising in the world, but wing beats — fifty-two to sixty-two per second. From now through May, rufous hummingbirds […]

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In the depths of the Lac-à-la-Tortue bog

Lac-à-la tortue_summer_NCC

Louis-Martin Pilote, NCC, guest contributor Peatlands are wetlands composed of plant residues accumulated over thousands of years. Although they are widespread in the Quebec landscape, they remain unknown to a large part of the population. However they provide us with many essential ecological services, such as water filtration and flood control. They are also valuable […]

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