From Our Own Borealis Blog

Crushing snowbanks could help to preserve permafrost and keep northern communities connected

By Patrick Jardine, new science communicator Northern field work 2:00 p.m. on March 9th, 2021: I was finishing sampling snow density along a mine access roadside in the central Yukon with my co-worker, Jen, when I heard branches breaking deep within the forest beside me. It was a balmy –15 °C out — a significant […]

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Tiny plants could be key to improving climate change predictions

By Rose Lefebvre, new science communicator Have you ever looked closely at moss? These tiny plants, described by F. E. Tripp in his 1868 book British Mosses, their homes, aspects, structure, and uses as “the soft green beds into which our feet sink”,  grow almost everywhere in the world. And yet mosses are often overlooked […]

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The changing landscape of permafrost data

By Nick Brown, new science communicator As permafrost research heats up, national and territorial geological surveys are digging up old data to help answer new questions about Canada’s cold regions. The need for permafrost data in Canada Permafrost – ground that is colder than 0°C for at least two years – is changing as Earth’s […]

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Why frozen mud is a technical challenge for climate scientists

By Charles Gauthier, new science communicator “So, it’s frozen mud?” my roommate asks when I try to explain my research topic to him. Since starting his own research in quantum physics, he has mastered the art of simple idioms. Perks of the trade, I suppose. This frozen mud, however, covers half of Canada’s land mass. […]

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Science writing behind the scenes: An interview with the winner of the Canadian Blood Services Lay Writing Competition

By Mary Anne Schoenhardt, Science and Society editor Have you ever wondered what it’s like to be a science communicator? Here at Science Borealis, our goal is to tell stories about Canadian science and help our fellow citizens understand the role that science plays in society. We’re a group of communicators from a variety of […]

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