Going dry: How decreasing water levels put our food supply at risk

Photo by skeeze via Pixabay CC 0

Kelsey Voss, New Science Communicator Freshwater: The most important resource of our fast-growing world. We need it to drink and to grow food. We use water for drinking, washing, industrial processes, natural resources, and growing food, but our water supply is dwindling. In recent decades, we have seen increasing declines in freshwater levels across the […]

Continue reading


A beginner’s guide to forming a student science policy group

Farah Qaiser, Policy & Politics co-editor, and Molly Sung, guest contributor Science policy organizations come in all shapes and sizes, and range from think tanks, non-profits, and private firms to community and student groups. In a previous blog post, Science Borealis highlighted the efforts of a student science policy group, Science & Policy Exchange (SPE), […]

Continue reading


Mind the (gender) gap: Big data with impact

Oxfam East Africa

Amanda Maxwell, Science Borealis editorial coordinator What image pops into your head when you hear the word ‘expert’ in news stories? It’s probably the stereotypic male authority. ‘Probably’ because globally women’s voices are missing from the news — we’re much more likely to hear and see men quoted as experts. Recognizing media bias is one […]

Continue reading


Technology in health care: Essential but costly

Image: CC maxpixel.net

Robert Gooding-Townsend and Braydon Black, Science in Society co-editors On April 23, 2019, the federal government announced an $81-million initiative to allow researchers to analyze health data across provinces. Dr. Kim McGrail, at the University of British Columbia, will lead The Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research (SPOR) Canadian Data Platform. According to the website, SPOR “will […]

Continue reading


What are Canadian climate scientists doing?

CCGS Amundsen

Tristan MacLean, Evidence for Democracy, guest contributor If I look outside my back door, I can see an old thermometer on my deck. To be honest, it’s not much use to me. It’s often too hot as it catches the sun’s rays reflected off the white walls of our house, or too cold because it’s […]

Continue reading