What we know and don’t know about Alzheimer’s disease

By Michael Ralph Limmena, Health, Medicine & Veterinary Science co-editor Canadians are living longer than ever — 2015 marked the first year that the number of Canadians older than 65 surpassed the number of children younger than 15. Unfortunately, the Alzheimer Society of Canada’s latest projections paint a grim picture for the future for many […]

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The sunshine vitamin sheds light on gut health

By Qiaochu Liang, guest contributor With winter just around the corner, some animals start building food caches, while others eat plenty of food to prepare for hibernation. This is also the perfect time for us humans to be proactive about getting enough essential nutrients, particularly vitamin D. What is vitamin D? Vitamins are a class […]

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Hitting the snooze button: is it time to let teens start school later in the day?

A notebook and an alarm clock surrounded by white numbers on a colourful background.

By Katie Compton, Policy & Politics editor Research has confirmed something that parents and teens have known for a long time: teenagers stay up later and sleep in longer than other age groups. This sleeping pattern isn’t an act of rebellion or a sign of laziness – it’s rooted in teens’ natural circadian rhythm. Forcing […]

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A frontline perspective on opioids: shifting user demographics and drug sources

A small child empties a prescription bill bottle on to a counter.

By Jenna Finley, Biology and Life Sciences editor Editor’s note: this post is the second in a two-part series by Jenna Finley on Canada’s opioid crisis. Check out Part 1 here. The characteristics of the opioid epidemic have evolved over time. The people who take these drugs, the sources of the drugs, and even their […]

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Rebuilding our urban forests with the My Tree app

By Ishara Yahampath, Communication, Education & Outreach editor Tree planting is an essential nature-based action for mitigating the effects of global warming. As trees grow, they absorb and store the carbon dioxide that drives global warming, provide shade for roads, buildings, and people, and food and habitat for local wildlife. While many Canadians recognize the […]

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