The benefits of learning to forget

by Jenna Finley, Biology & Life Sciences editor You may have heard it said, “Elephants never forget,”—but maybe they should. New research suggests that forgetting is a form of learning! This apparently contradictory statement could very well prove true in unpredictable environments. To understand why, let’s first take a look at how memory works. Memory […]

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Hooked on science crochet

science-crochet_tahani-baakdhah-used-with-permission

Raymond Nakamura, Multimedia editor You might think of crochet as just a pleasant hobby for passing long winter evenings during an endless pandemic. But in the right hands, crochet can also be a wonderful way to communicate science. Not only is Dr. Tahani Baakdhah a medical doctor with a Ph.D. in neurobiology, but she is […]

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Antimicrobial resistance: The silent pandemic

post-antimicrobial-age-due-to-antimicrobial-resistance_photo-by-qimono-from-pixabay

Jaspreet Sanghera, Biology and Life Sciences editor When was the last time you had the stomach flu, had your wisdom teeth removed, or had an ear infection? Most likely, you received an antibiotic, a type of antimicrobial drug designed to either prevent or treat bacterial infections. Alexander Fleming’s initial discovery of penicillin in 1928 brought […]

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Canadian researchers probe Lyme disease ecology to better understand the dynamics underlying this problematic illness

Brooklyn Bourgeois, new science communicator   A mysterious disease is creeping its way into Saskatchewan, and its diagnosis remains complicated and unstandardized. Lyme disease, a tick-borne bacterial infection, is spreading westwards and northwards into the province of Saskatchewan. The spread is due in part to climate change, which is increasing the range, abundance and activity […]

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Premature birth: Understanding why expecting parents give birth unexpectedly early

Nicholas J.C. Bauer, new science communicator   Birth occurring before 37 weeks of pregnancy is a leading cause of newborn death, disability, and developmental delays in humans. With 15 million babies worldwide – and eight per cent of babies in Canada – born prematurely each year, early birth is associated with massive healthcare costs and […]

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