What’s in a message? Unpacking the do’s and don’ts of climate change communication

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Maria Giammarco, Communication, Education, and Outreach Editor   The New York Times – “Ignore Climate Change At Your Peril” CTV News – “Canada warming twice as fast as rest of the world: scientific report” iPolitics – “Morning Brief: The future looks grim”   Aside from the obvious climate theme, what do these headlines have in common? Well, they’re […]

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Citizen science dives into water quality

using-Secchi-Disks-Kat Kavanagh-with-permission

Kirsten Grant, General Science co-editor  With millions of lakes in Canada, monitoring water quality is no small feat. Canada’s vastness means it’s impossible to collect data everywhere. The situation is made ever more difficult by a lack of funding for long-term environmental monitoring. But Water Rangers Executive Director Kat Kavanagh says citizens can play a part […]

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Going dry: How decreasing water levels put our food supply at risk

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Kelsey Voss, New Science Communicator Freshwater: The most important resource of our fast-growing world. We need it to drink and to grow food. We use water for drinking, washing, industrial processes, natural resources, and growing food, but our water supply is dwindling. In recent decades, we have seen increasing declines in freshwater levels across the […]

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Pinned: How natural history museums bridge research gaps in space and time

Photo by Alex Proimos

Kris Cu, New Science Communicator Jayme Lewthwaite, a PhD candidate who studies evolutionary biology at Simon Fraser University, enters the grand halls of the Smithsonian Institute of Natural History in Washington, DC. She walks past the elegant and elaborate exhibits, heading to the sun-lit research labs. She climbs to the floor labelled ‘Lepidoptera Collections’, which […]

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You’ve finished your PhD – What comes next?

Photo by NESA by Makers on Unsplash

Maria Giammarco, Science in Society Editor In 2011, the most recent year Statistics Canada collected national statistics on academic employment, aspiring academics faced a dire situation: just under 20% of PhD graduates in Canada worked as university professors. Given all the information available by now on the mismatch between education level and quality of jobs, […]

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