Logging into graduate school as an international student, 2: What to consider when choosing which province to study in

Photo: Element5 Digital, Pexels, CC0

Tarryn Bourhill and Jasleen Grewal, Communication, Education & Outreach editors Deciding to pursue graduate studies as an international student is a complex process. This series of posts is intended to provide resources and support to students in their decision-making as they explore graduate school opportunities in Canada. You can read more about financing your studies […]

Continue reading


The effects of “outdoor” domestic cats on wildlife

bird-killing cat from Pixabay

Tanya Samman and Alina Fisher, Environmental and Earth Sciences co-editors Disclaimer: Both Alina and Tanya are fans of both cats and wildlife. This post is not intended to alienate any outdoor cat owners. The intention is to demonstrate the effects these animals have on wildlife. The crime scene You open your door to find a […]

Continue reading


PalaeoPoems: Literary scicomm gives fossils a second chance at life

Artwork by Katrin Emery

Raymond Nakamura and Katrina Vera Wong, Multimedia editors Monsters of the prime Who tare each other in their slime —Thomas C. Weston, “Untitled,” Reminiscences among the rocks: in connection with the Geological Survey of Canada, 1889 ~ Excavating fossilized dinosaur bones or permineralized leaves is something we expect from a palaeontologist; digging up poems about […]

Continue reading


Why do we (dis)trust? A look at the science of credibility

Photo by Ketut Subiyanto from Pexels

Alice Fleerackers, Science in Society editor It’s March 9, 2021, exactly one year after the first COVID-19-related death was reported in my home province of British Columbia. I wake up to see Canadian Doctors Speak Out trending on Twitter. Curious, I click through. There, I uncover heated streams of tweets, some calling out misinformation, others […]

Continue reading


Between the Sand: Owen Fernley’s adventure under ground

Image courtesy of Owen Fernley.

Katrina Vera Wong In a Japanese ikebana flower arrangement, three stems are fixed at specific angles to represent heaven, earth, and man. Not only is it important to pay attention to the lines that those, or any additional stems, form, it’s also important to respect the spaces between those lines. We can recognize and value […]

Continue reading