Should science communication be funny?

by RaymondsBrain Raymond Nakamura

Raymond K. Nakamura, Multimedia editor The most exciting phrase in science is not “Eureka!” but, “That’s funny.” — Isaac Asimov When I contribute a post to a science blog, I usually add a comic, hoping some humour will make the article more attractive and engaging. But I often receive more positive comments about the comics […]

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Small but mighty: How citizen science can have a positive impact on the planet

hoto by Mount Rainier National Park, NPS, CC BY 2.0

Silvie Harder, Policy and Politics editor The Anna’s hummingbird is a tiny, bejewelled bird with shimmering fuchsia and lime green feathers. It weighs about as much as a cherry or grape, between three and six grams, and measures around 10 centimetres in length, about the same length as an apple. Their nests are four centimetres […]

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Logging into graduate school as an international student, 2: What to consider when choosing which province to study in

Photo: Element5 Digital, Pexels, CC0

Tarryn Bourhill and Jasleen Grewal, Communication, Education & Outreach editors Deciding to pursue graduate studies as an international student is a complex process. This series of posts is intended to provide resources and support to students in their decision-making as they explore graduate school opportunities in Canada. You can read more about financing your studies […]

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The effects of “outdoor” domestic cats on wildlife

bird-killing cat from Pixabay

Tanya Samman and Alina Fisher, Environmental and Earth Sciences co-editors Disclaimer: Both Alina and Tanya are fans of both cats and wildlife. This post is not intended to alienate any outdoor cat owners. The intention is to demonstrate the effects these animals have on wildlife. The crime scene You open your door to find a […]

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PalaeoPoems: Literary scicomm gives fossils a second chance at life

Artwork by Katrin Emery

Raymond Nakamura and Katrina Vera Wong, Multimedia editors Monsters of the prime Who tare each other in their slime —Thomas C. Weston, “Untitled,” Reminiscences among the rocks: in connection with the Geological Survey of Canada, 1889 ~ Excavating fossilized dinosaur bones or permineralized leaves is something we expect from a palaeontologist; digging up poems about […]

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