Veterinary researchers seek clues to more effective treatment for deadly dog disease

Nolan Chalifoux, New Science Communicator Taking your adorable new puppy to play at the dog park: priceless. Potential cost of not fully vaccinating your puppy first: several days in the veterinary hospital, thousands of dollars in intensive-care fees… and still no guarantee your puppy will survive. Many new pet owners face this shocking and unfortunate […]

Continue reading


Lessons learned at the Canadian Science Policy Conference 2018

Stefanie Novakowski, guest contributor From November 7 to 9, government researchers, policy-makers, academics, entrepreneurs, and science communicators met at the 10th annual Canadian Science Policy Conference in Ottawa, ON. This was an opportunity to share and discuss the major challenges and successes in Canada’s science policy landscape. Highlights of the event included talks by the Honourable […]

Continue reading


Multi-talented organisms: How seaweeds can affect our daily lives

Part-of-a-seaweed-ecosystem-Photo-Sophie-Steinhagen

Samanta Hoffmann, Nature Conservancy of Canada Seaweeds, a type of macro-algae (a group that includes benthic [attached to the bottom] marine algae that are typically visible to the naked eye), provide hope for a more sustainable future, through healthier food, renewable energy and fewer plastics. Over the last few years, not only have scientists developed […]

Continue reading


Where the river stops: Why habitat connectivity is critical for healthy fish populations across Canada

Fish On in the Yukon

by Dan Kraus, guest contributor Before you read any further, stop and think about a fish migrating up a river. Chances are that fish is a salmon and that river is in BC. There’s good reason that salmon in BC have come to symbolize fish migration. The return of millions of sockeye, Coho, chum, Chinook and […]

Continue reading


CRISPR-Cas9 technology and personalized medicine: What about Canada?

by Rick Gierczak, guest contributor CRISPR-Cas9 technology was accidentally discovered in the 1980s when scientists were researching how bacteria defend themselves against viral infection. While studying bacterial DNA called clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), they identified additional CRISPR-associated (Cas) protein molecules. Together, CRISPR and one of those protein molecules, termed Cas9, can locate […]

Continue reading