From Our Own Borealis Blog

The themes of nature: Exploring repeating patterns in the natural world

Chenoa van den Boogaard, Physics & Astronomy editor The world is a bustling place, naturally chaotic and unpredictable, yet a balance is found in the regularity of nature’s cycles and patterns. The rise and fall of the sun and moon, the passing of the seasons, and the arrival of each hour in the day keep […]

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Balancing conservation and tourism in Alberta’s national and provincial parks

Image by JD Hascup, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Emily Olson, Communications, Outreach, and Education editor   Canada is known for its vast, pristine wilderness, which are a source of pride for many Canadians. Connecting with nature and enjoying the wilderness draws many people to the country’s parks. Visitors flock to places like Banff National Park or Kananaskis Country to hike, glimpse wildlife, camp, and take […]

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A journey to the Canadian Arctic and its impact on the environment

Photo by Jamie D’Souza, 2018

Jamie D’Souza, guest contributor Since the 1960s, Churchill, Manitoba, the self-proclaimed ‘polar bear capital of the world’, has attracted thousands of tourists who hope to see polar bears lounging in the willows or on the shoreline of the Hudson Bay. But spotting a polar bear in its natural habitat near Churchill may soon become less […]

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Clara Deck: Just what you picture on our Instagram

Clara joined Science Borealis in December 2019 as a contributor to the social media pages and runs our Instagram account. Her background is in Earth and climate sciences, with a particular interest in glaciers and polar regions, completing a masters focused on glacial modeling at the University of Maine. Clara is passionate about science communication and […]

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How intergenerational trauma affects Indigenous communities

Photo by Thomas_H_foto, CC-BY-ND

Michael Ralph Limmena, Health, Medicine & Veterinary Science editor Warning: This article contains details that some readers may find distressing With the discovery of the potential graves of 215 Indigenous children at the former Kamloops Indian Residential School and a further 751 potential graves at the former Marieval Indian Residential School, many Canadians are horrified […]

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