What are Canadian climate scientists doing?

CCGS Amundsen

Tristan MacLean, Evidence for Democracy, guest contributor If I look outside my back door, I can see an old thermometer on my deck. To be honest, it’s not much use to me. It’s often too hot as it catches the sun’s rays reflected off the white walls of our house, or too cold because it’s […]

Continue reading


How to look at (and appreciate) SciArt

Raymond Nakamura

Katrina Vera Wong and Raymond Nakamura, Multi-media co-editors Some time ago, we talked to artists about what sciart is to them and what it could be. Various fields of science holding hands with art’s indefinability results in a complex relationship. In this post, rather than pinning down sciart’s definition, we’re going to explore some other […]

Continue reading


Weeding out invasive plant species once and floral


Photo by Liz West CC BY 2.0

Jenna Finley, Biology and Life Science co-editor  Invasive plants have been a source of frustration to Canadians for decades. These species pose a threat to our environment by “choking out” native plants and decreasing biodiversity, and are a threat to our economy. The federal government estimates that invasive species cost us about $30 billion annually (research, monitoring, management, […]

Continue reading


To fingerprint or not to fingerprint? That is the question

Chantal Mustoe, Chemistry co-editor In October 2013, in the case of Regina v. Bornyk, a man was arrested, tried and acquitted of breaking and entering in Surrey, British Columbia. The judge assessed the fingerprint evidence himself and dismissed it due to “unexplained discrepancies” and possible effects of “institutional bias” in fingerprinting and the “subjective certainty” of the […]

Continue reading