Fold it right there: The mathematical art of paper folding

The 2007 CSAIL puzzle created by Erik and Martin Demaine. Reproduced with permission. 

By Malgosia Ip, Mathematics and Statistics Editor “I really don’t think it’s possible,” I say again, unfolding the rumpled sheet of paper. I have been trying to solve one of Erik Demaine’s folding puzzles for a few hours now. Some of the creases have been folded so many times that the paper is starting to […]

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A new way to think about an ancient problem: Common weed provides hope for a possible novel cancer therapy

Dandelions in bloom. Dandelion root extract may provide a novel anti-cancer treatment therapy, says Dr. Siyaram Pandey of the University of Windsor. Photo © Waferboard, CC BY 2.0

By Sunitha Chari, Biology and Life Sciences co-editor Cancer, one of the leading causes of death in modern times, is not a new disease. It has been around since ancient times, with some of the earliest evidence found in Egyptian mummies. In fact, cancer derives its name from the Greek work for tumors, karkinos, and […]

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Satellite technology: beneficial for all or ill-fated endeavour?

Landsat spots birth of Iceberg A-68, Antarctica. Image acquired July 12, 2017. (Landsat imagery courtesy of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and U.S. Geological Survey)

By Kathi Unglert and Tanya Samman, Earth and Environmental Science Co-editors My radio alarm clock turns itself on at 7 A.M., and I wake to tunes on my favourite station, transmitted straight to my bedroom via satellite. What a great start! Satellite imagery can be used to forecast water availability in reservoirs and to monitor […]

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Turning science into stories: the craft of Ed Yong

By Robert Gooding-Townsend, Science in Society Co-editor Last October, at the height of the American presidential election, the internet was talking about nothing else. Well, almost. Amongst all the takes on Sanders and Clinton and Trump and Rubio and the future of America, one story rose to the top of The Atlantic’s website and stayed […]

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The path of totality

 By Kira Hoffman, General Science Co-editor This summer, many North Americans will witness a celestial wonder—a total solar eclipse. The moon will completely cover the sun for two minutes and forty seconds. This rare sight has not been viewed from coast to coast in the United States since 1918. The relatively narrow path of totality […]

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