Science journalism: the key to strong science literacy

by Pascal Lapointe, Policy & Politics editor Last month, Québecers learned that money talks when it comes to manipulating science information, whether you pay a public relations firm a high enough price, or if you buy advertising. At the same time, however, we’re cutting funding to science journalism. Perhaps these two should be reversed? TransCanada […]

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Ebola and the fear factory

by Kasra Hassani & Hannah Hoag Health, Medicine, and Veterinary Sciences editors This is not the first Science Borealis editorial post about Ebola, nor will it be the last. We’ve discussed Ebola from multiple perspectives such as Health, Engineering, and Policy over the past few months. The deadly virus – which had previously caused only […]

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What the Franklin expedition says about Canadian research priorities

By Pascal Lapointe and Karine Morin Policy and politics subject editors The discovery of one of the long-lost Franklin ships is surely big news, archaeologically speaking. But it is also highly political. Not simply because Franklin is used as a symbol of Canadian sovereignty in the Arctic, but also in the context of what has […]

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Was the Northern Gateway project approval a science-based decision?

By Karine Morin and Pascal Lapointe Science policy and politics subject editors Undoubtedly, the government’s approval on June 17, 2014, of a pipeline to transport oil from Alberta to the coast of British Columbia stands as one of the most important policy decisions of the year. By examining the regulatory framework applied and the review […]

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