Is extinction really forever?

mammoth-skeleton_Wilhelm-Tilesius

By Robert Gooding-Townsend, Science in Society co-editor Can biotechnology bring back extinct species? If it can, should it? In her new book Rise of the Necrofauna, Britt Wray chronicles the nascent movement to bring back extinct species. She calls these resurrected creatures “necrofauna”, conjuring images of undead mammoths, passenger pigeons, and more. As compelling as the […]

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Seeing Canada through the trees: How Canadians can lead the world in forest conservation

Black-Spruce-Bog_Whitemouth-River-watershed_Manitoba-by-Harvey-Sawatzky

by Dan Kraus, Nature Conservancy of Canada Forests define our Canadian geography and identity. One-third of our country is covered with trees, and forests occur in every province and territory. Jobs in forestry employ more than 200,000 Canadians and support many Indigenous and northern communities. Our forests are the reason why I’ve had days in […]

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Science advocacy can save Canadian science (and the next generation of Canadian scientists)

Scientists-march-on-Parliament-Hill

By Molly Meng-Hua Sung, guest contributor This past year, the long-awaited Fundamental Science Review (commonly referred to as the Naylor Report) was submitted to Canada’s Minister of Science, the Honourable Kirsty Duncan. It confirmed something scientists have been saying for years: funding is tight. Furthermore, the strain of poor funding is borne largely by young […]

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Canadian science needs more than funding: it needs public champions

by Dr. Sarah Boon, Science Borealis co-founder and Board of Directors member Two reviews of Canadian science were released recently: the Naylor Report and the Global Young Academy report. While both champion Canadian science, neither report mentions that increasing funding for Canadian science requires public support and a strong Canadian science culture, which requires effective […]

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