Windows into local waters: Community aquariums connect communities to local sealife and ocean oddities

Photo by Raul Pacheco Vega

Hannah Reid, New Science Communicator The wet sand squishes beneath my gumboots as I walk along a beach near Tofino, on the western edge of Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Last night’s storm has strewn bull kelp and broken shells across the beach. It has also landed a true ocean oddity: a mermaid’s purse. I pick […]

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New reproductive tool may help meet consumer demand for “natural” food

Chris Jermey, New Science Communicator Today’s consumers want more from their food, and the beef and dairy industries are constantly striving to meet these demands. As more companies market their food as “natural” – raised without additional use of hormones, steroids, and antibiotics – concerns regarding steroid use in food production have multiplied. For example, […]

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This worm may be a dog’s best friend

Sydney Murray, New Science Communicator Most pet owners want nothing but the best for their furry mates. They go to great lengths to make sure their pets are living happy and healthy lives. But good intentions do not always protect pets from unknown ingredients in pet food. Acrylamide is a particularly nasty chemical commonly found […]

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Every breath we take: Shedding light on the hidden workings of healing in our lungs

Vanessa Brown, New Science Communicator Our lungs face a never-ending battle. With every breath, we inhale millions of airborne particles, including many that are potentially harmful. Our bodies must be prepared to defend us from these invaders. Most of us are equipped with immune systems comprised of an army of specialized cells for this particular […]

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When mountains collapse: New-tech geodatabase helps geologists assess landslide hazard and risk

Jesse Mysiorek, New Science Communicator Early in the morning of August 2, 2014, part of a mountain collapsed in Jure, Nepal, about 70 kilometres northeast of Kathmandu. Some 5.5 million cubic metres of rock and debris — equal to the size of Grouse Mountain, north of Vancouver, BC — tumbled down into the Sunkoshi Valley, […]

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