Teleportation is possible — in the quantum world at least

image by Matthias Weinberger, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Chenoa van den Boogaard, Physics & Astronomy editor Teleportation has finally become a reality. But before you get too excited, the type of teleportation scientists are experimenting with is not the same as what you’ve seen on Star Trek. Scientists are not trying to teleport people or objects from one place to another. Instead, they […]

Continue reading


What the next supernova can teach us, and why astronomers hope it will come from Betelgeuse

Credit: ESO/L. Calçada

Chenoa van den Boogaard, Physics & Astronomy editor In October 2019, astronomers noticed that Betelgeuse, the red supergiant star that forms the left shoulder of the constellation Orion, was beginning to dim. While variable stars such as Betelgeuse regularly experience dim and bright phases throughout their lives, this recent dimming phase was unusual because the […]

Continue reading


The science fiction and reality of spaceflight

Ryan Marciniak, Astronomy and Physics Co-Editor Science fiction has captured humanity’s dreams of travelling to distant stars, colonizing new worlds, accessing new dimensions, encountering hostile aliens, and surviving a galaxy far, far away. Yet with all our real-world technological prowess, why haven’t any of these dreams become reality? The short answer is that flying into […]

Continue reading


Entropy is everything

By Deanna Kerry, New Science Communicator Guest Blogger Physics is the foundation of all sciences. It provides fundamental laws that describe how objects move and interact with one another. Any system can be examined from the perspective of physics, even things that would normally be thought of as biology or chemistry. To understand difficult concepts, […]

Continue reading


Why all the fuss about neutrinos?

SNOlab infrastructure

by Emmanuel Fonseca & Steph Taylor Physics & Astronomy subject editors On October 6, 2015, the winners of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics were announced. Canada’s Arthur Macdonald and Japan’s Takaaki Kajita would receive the award for their contributions to understanding tiny particles called neutrinos. Neutrinos (an Italian word for “little neutral one”) are […]

Continue reading