Communicating science through picture books: Illustrator Kari Rust

By Raymond K. Nakamura, Multimedia editor Picture books about scientists heighten younger readers’ awareness that science is a human endeavour. Picture books not only help young readers develop literacy; they are also an art form all their own. To find out more about this often-overlooked style of science communication, I reached out to Canadian illustrator, […]

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Hooked on science crochet

science-crochet_tahani-baakdhah-used-with-permission

Raymond Nakamura, Multimedia editor You might think of crochet as just a pleasant hobby for passing long winter evenings during an endless pandemic. But in the right hands, crochet can also be a wonderful way to communicate science. Not only is Dr. Tahani Baakdhah a medical doctor with a Ph.D. in neurobiology, but she is […]

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Feeling zine: Developing science communication skills through reflection

when-you-open-your-eyes-there-really-is-much-more-to-see-than-just-orion-white-dwarfs-and-binary-stars

Raymond K. Nakamura, Multimedia editor   “I was so proud of my public lecture. All my scientist friends say I did an excellent job. But I saw the glaze in my parents’ eyes; I missed the mark.” – Lia Formenti, from her reflection on science communication in the McGill Space Institute’s zine.   Reflection involves […]

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Should science communication be funny?

by RaymondsBrain Raymond Nakamura

Raymond K. Nakamura, Multimedia editor The most exciting phrase in science is not “Eureka!” but, “That’s funny.” – Isaac Asimov When I contribute a post to a science blog, I usually add a comic, hoping some humour will make the article more attractive and engaging. But I often receive more positive comments about the comics […]

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PalaeoPoems: Literary scicomm gives fossils a second chance at life

Artwork by Katrin Emery

Raymond Nakamura and Katrina Vera Wong, Multimedia editors Monsters of the prime Who tare each other in their slime – Thomas C. Weston, “Untitled,” Reminiscences among the rocks: in connection with the Geological Survey of Canada, 1889 ~ Excavating fossilized dinosaur bones or permineralized leaves is something we expect from a palaeontologist; digging up poems […]

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