From chaotic to biotic

Photo-by-Mike-Dembeck

By Jamie Miller, guest contributor from the Nature Conservancy of Canada There’s a new breed of problem emerging, and these problems are making a lot of people uncomfortable. Aptly named “wicked problems” because of their complex and high uncertainty, they’re defined by having multiple contradicting values, high uncertainty, high stakes and require urgent decision-making. They’re […]

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10 species protected, thanks to Nature Conservancy of Canada Conservation Volunteers, coast to coast

5-star-bee-hotel-photo-NCC

by Raechel Bonomo, guest contributor So far this year, hundreds of volunteers from across the country have gathered to lend a hand for nature at events hosted by the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC). Whether it was removing invasive species wreaking havoc on a delicate forest, or cleaning up shorelines along Canada’s rocky, saltwater coasts, the […]

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Seeing Canada through the trees: How Canadians can lead the world in forest conservation

Black-Spruce-Bog_Whitemouth-River-watershed_Manitoba-by-Harvey-Sawatzky

by Dan Kraus, Nature Conservancy of Canada Forests define our Canadian geography and identity. One-third of our country is covered with trees, and forests occur in every province and territory. Jobs in forestry employ more than 200,000 Canadians and support many Indigenous and northern communities. Our forests are the reason why I’ve had days in […]

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Science advocacy can save Canadian science (and the next generation of Canadian scientists)

Scientists-march-on-Parliament-Hill

By Molly Meng-Hua Sung, guest contributor This past year, the long-awaited Fundamental Science Review (commonly referred to as the Naylor Report) was submitted to Canada’s Minister of Science, the Honourable Kirsty Duncan. It confirmed something scientists have been saying for years: funding is tight. Furthermore, the strain of poor funding is borne largely by young […]

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Rescuing roadside reptiles

by Kristyn Ferguson It was a warm, late-June evening, while driving on a backroad near my home in Guelph, Ontario, when I saw a familiar sight up ahead: a car pulled off to the side of the road, at least one human standing on the road, looking concerned, and the dome of a turtle’s shell […]

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