Ethanol: A cocktail drink and a clean and sustainable fuel for your car

Sunitha Chari, Biology and Life Sciences co-editor While horse-drawn carriages are a quaint reminder of Victorian England, the internal combustion engine that powers our automobiles is one of the most significant inventions of the 19th century. There are approximately 34 million motor vehicles in Canada. While some are public or shared transport, it is not uncommon […]

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The Science Fiction and Reality of Spaceflight

Ryan Marciniak, Astronomy and Physics Co-Editor Science fiction has captured humanity’s dreams of travelling to distant stars, colonizing new worlds, accessing new dimensions, encountering hostile aliens, and surviving a galaxy far, far away. Yet with all our real-world technological prowess, why haven’t any of these dreams become reality? The short answer is that flying into […]

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Art that’s out of this world

By Katrina Vera Wong and Raymond Nakamura, Multimedia co-editors As Science Borealis Multimedia editors, we scour the known universe, meaning Canada, for examples of science communication in all its myriad forms. Vancouver artist and educator Erin Green has been creating space-inspired art for about 10 years. She says, “Space art makes space science more relatable and […]

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Materials science meets artificial intelligence

Erin Bedford, Technology and Engineering co-editor Illustrations by Geoffrey Lee, Sketchy Science We’re in the midst of a revolution in materials science—artificial intelligence (AI) is changing the way we discover new materials. Scientists don’t have to worry about being replaced by machines anytime soon, however. Rather than replacing the thought-work of researchers, AI is expanding […]

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Is the Antarctica ice sheet the key to understanding neutrinos?

Scientists are hoping to boost the ability of the neutrino detection system, IceCube.

Michelle Hampson, Astronomy and Physics guest contributor Neutrinos are mysterious particles that hardly ever interact with matter. About 100 trillion pass through your body each second without you knowing any better. Despite their abundance, however, their laissez faire behavior makes them extremely difficult to study. Scientists have been working for decades to pinpoint the astrophysical sources of these […]

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